The healthiest parts of foods you may be overlooking

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Ever set out to enjoy a juicy organic orange, yet crinkle your nose at the sight of that stringy, white skin? Maybe you even peel back a few layers just to get one step closer to that orange goodness.

Not so fast!

Turns out that a lot of the fruits and veggies we eat have tons of health benefits in the parts of them we may be overlooking. As always, chose organic foods for optimal health.

The best parts of foods you (maybe) haven’t discovered yet

The pith of an orange:

That white stuff between the fruit and the peel that often adheres to the orange is the pith, and it’s where the fruit’s highest concentration of flavonoids call home. These flavonoids play a role in protection against certain cancers and help with heart disease prevention.

This isn’t to say that it’s time to do a complete reversal and discard the fruit in favor of just the pith; the entire orange is loaded with vitamin C, fiber and flavonoids. It’s just that the pith is the fruit’s powerhouse, and is often thrown away or peeled from the fruit when it should be enjoyed!

Watermelon rind:

Although certainly crunchier and not quite as flavorful as the flesh itself, the rind is very rich in something called citrulline. Published studies talk about the fact that this compound, found in the rind, has antioxidant properties that fight free-radicals and lead to a healthier system. For more information about watermelon rind and tips on how to eat it, take a look at this story.

Pineapple core:

Don’t ditch that pineapple core. Go ahead and eat it. Pineapple contains bromelain, a naturally-occurring protein enzyme that may alleviate inflammation and pain. Studies have shown that bromelain content is most concentrated in the pineapple’s core.

Broccoli stalks:

Be a stalker . . . when it comes to broccoli, that is (we don’t need to see any of our fans on the nightly news). The tendency is to cut the stalks from the florets and discard them, but did you know that the stalks have just as much fiber and antioxidants? So eat it all raw, add stalks to a salad, juice them . . . as the saying goes, “it’s all good.” Literally.

Kiwi skin:

This one often gets a “Really? I can eat that?” from people. But it’s true. That fuzzy brown part of the kiwi is safe to consume and according to experts, boasts three times the fiber than strictly ingesting the green flesh. Who knew?

Do you already enjoy these parts of foods? Are there others you’ve tried? Let us know; we’d enjoy hearing from you.

Sources for this article include:

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